SAMPLE MENU OF PROTEIN CONTENT

Ovolactovegetarian menu       Protein content (g)

Breakfast  
Oat bran bagel (1) 6.1
Whipped cream cheese (2 Tbsp) 0.7
Seedless raisins (1/4 c) 0.8
1% Low-fat milk (8oz) 9.9
Coffee (12 oz) 0
 Morning snack  
Fresh orange (1) 1.6
 Lunch   
Sandwich with:  
Low-fat monterey jack cheese (1 oz) 7.6
Cherry tomatoes (5) 0.4
Thinly sliced cucumber 0.2
Sliced green bell peppers (1/4 c) 0.2
Whole wheat bread (2 slices) 6.0
Baby carrots (8) 0.5
Fresh apple (1) 0.5
Water (12 oz) 0
 Afternoon snack  
Diet carbonated beverage (12 oz) 0
Dry roasted peanuts (1/4 c) 6.0
 Dinner  
Vegetarian stew (1 c) 42.0
Brown rice (3/4 c) 3.0
Steamed broccoli spears (1 c) 3.2
Salad with garbanzo beans (l/4 c) 3.5
Low calorie salad dressing (2 Tbsp) 0.1
Whole wheat roll (1) 2.2
Soft margarine (1 Tbsp) 0
Fresh cantaloupe (1 c) 0
Iced tea, unsweetened (12 oz) 0
 Evening snack  
1% Low-fat milk (8 oz) 9.9
Cinnamon graham crackers (4) 3.1

Total                                            107.5

Sample menu                          Protein content (g)

Breakfast  
Oat bran bagel (1) 6.1
Whipped cream cheese (2 Tbsp) 0.7
Seedless raisins (1/4 c) 0.8
1% Low-fat milk (8oz) 9.9
Coffee (12 oz) 0
 Morning snack  
Fresh orange (1) 1.6
 Lunch  
Sandwich with:  
Tuna salad  (1/4 oz) 8.1
Tomato slices (2) 0.4
Thinly sliced cucumber 0.2
Sliced green bell peppers (1/4 c) 0.2
Whole wheat bread (2 slices) 6.0
Baby carrots (8) 0.5
Fresh apple (1) 0.5
Water (12 oz) 0
 Afternoon snack  
Diet carbonated beverage (12 oz) 0
Dry roasted peanuts (1/4 c) 6.0
 Dinner  
Lean roast beef (2 oz)
Brown gravy (1/4 c)
21.42.2
Brown rice (3/4 c) 3.0
Steamed broccoli spears (1 c) 3.2
Melted reduced fat and sodium cheddar cheese  (l/4 c)
Mixed green salad (1 ½ c)
6.0
Low calorie salad dressing (2 Tbsp) 0.1
Whole wheat roll (1) 2.2
Soft margarine (1 Tbsp) 0
Fresh cantaloupe (1 c) 0
Iced tea, unsweetened (12 oz) 0
 Evening snack  
1% Low-fat milk (8 oz) 9.9
Cinnamon graham crackers (4) 3 1

Total                                            92.6

  

 

Protein content of sample menu and modifications for ovolactovegetarian diet. (Nutrient data from U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service. U.S Department of Agriculture, national Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20, 2008.

Nutritional Directions

  • Increased muscular activity does not seem to elevate the
    protein requirement except for a small increase needed for
    muscle development during conditioning. Athletes may
    require 1.2 to 1.7 g of protein a day depending on the inten-
    sity of training. This should be determined by a registered
    dietitian specializing in sports nutrition.
  • Protein requirements should be met by foods from several
    sources (even animal protein foods) because of other nutri-
    ents that accompany the protein. For example, pork is an
    excellent source of thiamin; red meats furnish a significant
    amount of iron. In contrast, too many egg yolks in the diet
    contribute excessive cholesterol.
  • Animal sources of protein are generally the most expensive.
    When people have limited resources, they can: 
    (1) eat protein in adequate but not excessive amounts
    (2) use a variety of proteins of lower quality (which are less expensive)
    (3) purchase less expensive kinds of protein foods.
  • The color of the eggshell is not related to its nutritional value.
    The breed of the hen determines the color.
  • Reinforce the lack of benefit and possible danger of taking
    amino acid supplements if protein intake is adequate.